Officially... the tropical storm in the Bay of Bengal was named `Gulab`... so what does it mean?

طقس العرب GO 2021-09-25 2021-09-25T18:20:49Z
سنان خلف
سنان خلف
محرر أخبار جوية- قسم التواصل الاجتماعي
Officially... the tropical storm in the Bay of Bengal was named `Gulab`... so what does it mean?

<p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><strong>Weather of Arabia - The tropical storm &quot;Gulab&quot;</strong> was officially called the tropical storm currently stationed to the north of the Indian Ocean, specifically in the Bay of Bengal region, which is considered the first during the second season of tropical and cyclone activity in the region for this year,</p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><h2 style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> <strong>Tropical Storm &quot;Galab&quot; .. What does it mean?</strong></h2><h2 style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></h2><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> <strong>Gulab or Gulab</strong> , is a Pakistani name, meaning &quot;rose&quot;, and it is written (gulab) in Urdu, as the letters J and G are two different letters in Urdu.</p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> <strong>See also:</strong></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> <strong><a href="https://www.arabiaweather.com/ar/content/%D9%87%D9%84-%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%81... there a good chance for a tropical situation to develop in the Arabian Sea at the end of next week? .. from here</a></strong></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><h2 style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> <strong>How are hurricanes named?</strong></h2><h2 style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></h2><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> <b>Tropical Storm</b> <strong>Gulab</strong> <b>&nbsp;</b> Many questions arise about how hurricanes and tropical storms are named around the world. Together, we will begin by answering this question and reviewing the stages that the naming process has gone through throughout history:</p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><ul style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><li style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> <strong>Hurricanes</strong> were called in the past, either by the names of some saints, such as the hurricane &quot;Hercules&quot; and &quot;Saint Paul&quot;, the hurricane &quot;St. Louis&quot; <strong>and the hurricane</strong> &quot;Santa Maria&quot;, or by the names of the years in which they occurred, such as the <strong>hurricane of</strong> 1898 AD and the hurricane of 1906 AD, or according to the place in which they occurred as: Hurricanes Miami and Hurricanes Houston, or, depending on the region, such as &quot; <strong>Hurricane</strong> Galveston.&quot;</li></ul><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><ul style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><li style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> Australian meteorologist Clement Rag (1852 - 1922) was the first to create the &quot;systematic nomenclature&quot; of cyclones, in order to avoid confusion and confusion that people might fall into, especially in some areas where tropical cyclones abound, where hurricanes were called the names of parliamentarians who were rejecting Vote for loans to fund meteorological research, and hurricanes were sometimes named after the women they hated</li></ul><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><ul style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><li style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> During World War II, the US armed forces named hurricanes, as the US Air Force and Navy were closely monitoring and monitoring <strong>hurricanes</strong> in the Pacific Northwest, and to prevent multiple names and differences around them, military meteorologists named hurricanes after their wives or girlfriends</li></ul><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><ul style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><li style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> In 1953, the US Weather Administration decided to adopt naming <strong>hurricanes</strong> after women and in alphabetical order, with the exception of the letters (Q, U, XY &amp; Z).</li></ul><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><ul style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><li style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> Male names were introduced to the naming of hurricanes in 1978, where the method of naming is as follows: in years ending in an even number, the naming begins with a masculine name. For years ending in a singular number, the beginning is in the name of Month.</li></ul><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><ul style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><li style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> The names that were agreed upon by the World Meteorological Organization are divided into 6 lists, each list containing 21 names that recur after 6 years of use. Exceptions to this rule are the <strong>names of hurricanes</strong> that have caused significant damage, such as Catherina and Rita.</li></ul><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><ul style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><li style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> East Asian countries chose to stay away from American names, so they began calling their own hurricanes, and canceled the names imported from America, such as Hurricane &quot;Ted&quot; and Hurricane &quot;Frankie&quot;, which are American names given to Asian hurricanes on the pretext that they are not understood by their people, so they used animal names instead of human names such as <strong>hurricane</strong> &quot;Damri&quot; means &quot;elephant&quot; in the Cambodian language, and &quot;Kirogi&quot; is the name of a rare species of teal in North Korea.</li></ul><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><ul style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><li style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> Cyclones that form in the northern Indian Ocean are named by the Specialized Regional Center for Meteorology based in New Delhi, India on behalf of the member countries of the International Meteorological Organization and the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific.</li></ul><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> Hurricanes are referred to as hurricanes in the Atlantic, Typhoon refers to cyclones in the Pacific Ocean and Southeast Asia, and Cyclone refers to hurricanes in the Indian Ocean.</p>

This article was written originally in Arabic and is translated using a 3rd party automated service. ArabiaWeather is not responsible for any grammatical errors whatsoever.

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