Romantic animals that remain faithful to only one pair for life

طقس العرب GO 2022-11-10 2022-11-10T19:51:20Z
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Romantic animals that remain faithful to only one pair for life

<p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr">Weather of Arabia - <a href="https://ngalarabiya.com/article/4318423/10-%D8%AD%D9%8A%D9%88%D8%A7%D9%8... Geographic Arabic</a> - What makes an animal want to stay with one animal for the rest of its life?</p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> <strong>Every day is a &quot;love day&quot; for these animals that mate with one partner for life</strong></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><br /> Monogamy may not be the norm for most creatures on Earth, but for a few, it is the secret to survival. Take the field mouse, for example. This rodent, unlike most of its relatives, mates with only one female, builds a nest together, and takes care of one another as they take care of the young together. This monogamous field mouse behavior is rooted in the vast plains of the United States and Canada where the animals have to fight over limited resources, and reproduce as much as possible during this mouse&#39;s short life of one to two years; So collaborating like one team helps him get more done in a short time.</p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> For voles, some experts say, it goes beyond simply needing to cooperate to survive. Chemical compounds in the brain play a greater role in forming strong bonds between voles than in other rodents. The voles may be seen as &quot;socially monogamous&quot; but not &quot;genetically monogamous&quot;, as one pair may sometimes mate with a strange mouse, for which scientists have not been able to find a clear explanation. &quot;It is not completely faithful, and this may make it a closer example of human behavior,&quot; says researcher William Kinkel of the Kinsey Institute in Indiana, USA.</p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> Scientists find many examples in the animal kingdom of beings whose eyes do not deviate from their only husband, and other beings that are largely monogamous. Whatever the case may be for her; Here are some creatures who believe in the blessing of monism </p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/uploads-2020/0e48a250-d155-4249-8e79-547c766ae816.jpeg" style="width: 447px; height: 297px;" /></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><blockquote style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> The pinecone lizard lives alone most of the year, but it returns to the same partner during the mating season. The couple may sometimes trek together as the male follows the female - Photo: Joel Sartore, National Geographic&#39;s &quot;Photo Astronomy&quot; project. </p></blockquote><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/uploads-2020/6b0a4b25-4801-45b2-83a1-240d603a1d91.jpeg" style="width: 477px; height: 296px;" /></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><blockquote style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> The &quot;big-bellied&quot; sea horse shows and flirts, while females compete for his favor and attention; It is important for the female to mate with one reliable male as he is responsible for carrying the eggs - Photo: Joel Sartore, National Geographic&#39;s Image Astronomy project. </p></blockquote><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/uploads-2020/25f6fe39-2233-41d1-aad2-a8512a800a78.jpeg" style="width: 1200px; height: 746px;" /></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><blockquote style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> Within a pack of gray wolves, mating between a dominant male and a female establishes a social order, and monogamous partners often mate once a year for breeding - Photo: Joel Sartore, National Geographic&#39;s Image Astronomy project. </p></blockquote><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/uploads-2020/7b1abb8e-7fd0-483f-9451-701573f3f3de.jpeg" style="width: 1200px; height: 746px;" /></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><blockquote style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> Lar gibbons are often monogamous, with one of 10 offspring born to a male other than a pair - Photo: Joel Sartore, National Geographic&#39;s Image Astronomy project. </p></blockquote><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/uploads-2020/bd82fa13-53d0-4042-9061-9c8a31b09f9e.jpeg" style="width: 1200px; height: 746px;" /></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><blockquote style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> A male &quot;black-necked swan&quot; beats the males with his wings to keep them away from his mating partner, tending the young after the eggs hatch while the female leaves in search of food - Photo: Joel Sartore, National Geographic&#39;s Image Astronomy project. </p></blockquote><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/uploads-2020/1346eafd-73fd-4012-ab91-bb62e412d9fa.jpeg" style="width: 1200px; height: 746px;" /></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><blockquote style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> When a Macaroni penguin couple meet after an absence, they overflow with enthusiasm and show their love by shouting and shaking their heads left and right. This behavior is called &quot;orgasm display&quot; - Photo: Joel Sartore, National Geographic&#39;s &quot;Photo Astronomy&quot; project. </p></blockquote><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/uploads-2020/5d811bb0-57d2-4fe1-931a-8386a5e00fa0.jpeg" style="width: 1200px; height: 746px;" /></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><blockquote style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> Pairs of &quot;black eagles&quot; are very similar and do not show any difference in size or plumage, as is the case with long-term married couples - Photo: Joel Sartore, National Geographic&#39;s &quot;Photo Ark&quot; project. </p></blockquote><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/uploads-2020/888be520-2fb9-4609-bbd3-b979a6d61927.jpeg" style="width: 1200px; height: 746px;" /></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><blockquote style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> A field mouse photographed in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA. Unlike most rodents, a field mouse and its partner build a nest and take care of each other and care for the young together - Photo: Joel Sartore, National Geographic&#39;s Image Ark project. </p></blockquote><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/uploads-2020/4d6a2564-f4f1-460a-9852-4b0936b3ebb5.jpeg" style="width: 1200px; height: 746px;" /></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><blockquote style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> The bald eagle spends the winter alone and reunites with its female during the mating season. The male stays with his partner until the eggs hatch and feed the young in the first months of their lives - Photo: Joel Sartore, National Geographic&#39;s &quot;Photo Astronomy&quot; project. </p></blockquote><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><img alt="" src="/sites/default/files/uploads-2020/1311787d-8597-4c82-a625-0dc7611b65a1.jpeg" style="width: 1200px; height: 746px;" /></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><blockquote style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> For Canadian cranes, the squawk reaffirms the bonds between the spouses, as the female shrieks and the male responds with one call, which he calls &quot;the call of harmony&quot; - Photo: Joel Sartore, National Geographic&#39;s &quot;Ask of Images&quot; project.</p></blockquote><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"></p><p style=";text-align:left;direction:ltr"> Source: <a href="https://ngalarabiya.com/article/4318423/10-%D8%AD%D9%8A%D9%88%D8%A7%D9%8... Geographic Arabic</a></p>

This article was written originally in Arabic and is translated using a 3rd party automated service. ArabiaWeather is not responsible for any grammatical errors whatsoever.

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